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Is the real you trapped behind your eczema or plaque psoriasis?

If you struggle with eczema or plaque psoriasis, consider participating in a clinical trial evaluating a targeted, steroid-free study ointment being developed by Pfizer.

If you prequalify and give your permission, your information will be forwarded to a member of the clinical research team. They will contact you to discuss more information about participation.

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About the Study

The EMPORIA 2 Study is evaluating a steroid-free study ointment being developed by Pfizer to see if it may safely and effectively reduce symptoms of eczema (atopic dermatitis) and plaque psoriasis.

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How Do I Qualify for the Study?

You may be able to participate in the study if you:

  • Are age 12 or older*
  • Have been diagnosed with eczema or plaque psoriasis

There are additional requirements to participate. The clinical research team will discuss those requirements with you to help determine if you are eligible to participate.

*Only people ages 18 or older can take the online prescreener. For those between ages 12 and 17, have a parent or guardian contact your doctor.

If you prequalify and give your permission, your information will be forwarded to a member of the clinical research team. They will contact you to discuss more information about participation.

Why Should I Take Part in the Study?

If you qualify and decide to participate you will:

  • Receive the steroid-free study ointment or a placebo and all study-related medical tests at no charge
  • Be monitored by a study physician throughout your participation
  • Help advance scientific knowledge and potentially improve the care of people with eczema or plaque psoriasis
  • Be reimbursed for any reasonable expenses that you may have as a result of taking part in this clinical research study. These may include parking, meals, or other travel-related expenses. You do not need health insurance to take part.

 

Your safety while participating is our highest priority. If you have questions or concerns at any point throughout the study, a clinical research team member is available. Your participation is voluntary, and you are free to withdraw at any time. Your privacy will be maintained throughout the study.

If you prequalify and give your permission, your information will be forwarded to a member of the clinical research team. They will contact you to discuss more information about participation.

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If you prequalify and give your permission, your information will be forwarded to a member of the clinical research team. They will contact you to discuss more information about participation.

About Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema, is a chronic condition that causes inflammation, redness, and irritation of the skin. It generally develops in infancy and childhood, though it can appear in adulthood.

Eczema causes itchy skin.1,2 Other symptoms include1:

  • Dry, red patches
  • Rashes that may bleed or ooze clear fluid if scratched
  • Thickened, hardened skin

The rash may appear on the face, scalp, elbows, knees, neck, ankles, hands, feet, and/or near the eyes. At times, the condition gets worse (flares), while at other times it gets better (remissions).1

While the cause of eczema is not known, researchers believe that genetic mutations, the immune system, and environmental triggers (such as tobacco smoke and fragrances) may play a role in this condition.1 The chances of developing eczema increase if there is a family history of eczema, asthma, or hay fever.1 People with eczema may have asthma and other allergies, including food allergies, and they may experience anxiety or depression and have difficulty sleeping.1

References:

  1. Atopic dermatitis. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/atopic-dermatitis
  2. Atopic dermatitis/What is atopic dermatitis? National Eczema Association. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/types-of-eczema/atopic-dermatitis

About Plaque Psoriasis

In people with the skin condition plaque psoriasis, the body creates new skin cells much faster than normal. The skin cells pile up and can cause thick, scaly patches called plaques.1 These patches are most likely to occur on the knees, elbows, scalp, and lower back—and they tend to itch and sometimes burn or sting.1,2

Though the exact cause of plaque psoriasis is unknown, researchers believe that an overactive immune system and genetics play important roles.2 People who have plaque psoriasis may develop other health problems such as psoriatic arthritis.2

References:

  1. Psoriasis overview. American Academy of Dermatology. Accessed May 16, 2022. https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/psoriasis/what/overview
  2. About psoriasis. National Psoriasis Foundation. Updated November 19, 2021. Accessed May 16, 2022. https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis/

Frequently Asked Questions

This section will help answer some important questions you may have.

About the EMPORIA 2 Study

The EMPORIA 2 Study is evaluating a steroid-free study ointment to see if it may safely and effectively reduce symptoms of eczema and plaque psoriasis.

If you qualify and decide to participate, you will be in the clinical research study for up to 21 weeks (just over 5 months). There will be up to 10 visits to the clinical research site.

There are 3 phases to this clinical research study. Screening lasts up to 4 weeks and involves medical tests to see if you qualify for the study. The Treatment period lasts up to 12 weeks and is when you apply the steroid-free study ointment or a placebo daily, along with visiting the clinic (8 times in 12 weeks) for health assessments. About 4 or 5 weeks after you receive the last dose of the study ointment is a Follow-up Visit, during which your overall health and eczema or plaque psoriasis symptoms will be evaluated.

Before you agree to participate, the clinical research team will go over all aspects of the study with you. If you decide to participate, you will be given a document called an Informed Consent Form that provides, in writing, the study’s purpose, assessments, procedures, potential benefits and risks, and precautions. You will have the opportunity to ask any questions you have, then you can decide if participating is right for you.

If you are eligible to participate, the clinical research team can answer all of your questions.

A placebo looks like the study ointment but does not contain any active medicine. Yes, there is a chance that you will receive a placebo. You will be randomly assigned (by chance) to receive the steroid-free study ointment or the placebo. The clinical research team can give you more information about your chances of receiving a placebo.

The clinical research team will respect and protect your privacy and will not share your information except as required by law. Your personal information will be stored with codes that do not identify you. The Informed Consent Form will provide more information about how your privacy will be protected.

Yes, your participation is completely voluntary, so you may withdraw from the study, for any reason, and at any time. If you do decide to leave early, you will be asked to notify the clinical research team before doing so. You will also be asked to return to the clinical research site at least once to complete a final visit and return any unused study ointment.

No. You will get the study treatment or a placebo and all study-related medical tests at no charge. You will be reimbursed for any reasonable expenses that you may have as a result of taking part in this clinical research study. These may include parking, meals, or other travel-related expenses. You do not need health insurance to take part.

No, you do not need your doctor’s permission to participate. However, either you or the study doctor, with your permission, may contact your personal physician to discuss your participation in the clinical research study before you begin and keep your physician up to date about your progress during the study.

About clinical research studies

A clinical research study (also called a clinical trial) tries to answer questions about how medicines work in the people who take them. Researchers run studies to test whether a study medicine is safe and effective. These studies may help doctors find new ways to help prevent, detect, or treat health issues.

Participant safety is the priority in a clinical research study. There are rules in place to help protect the rights, safety, and well-being of people who volunteer for studies. These rules help ensure that research studies follow strict scientific and ethical guidelines.

Before a study can begin, a review board or ethics committee must review and approve the study.

Only patients who meet all eligibility criteria for a clinical research study may take part. The clinical research team will review your medical history and current medical status against the eligibility criteria. You may also be asked to provide information from your medical records to help the clinical research team determine whether or not you may be eligible to participate.

A study medicine is a drug that hasn’t yet been approved for use in the general public. In order to be approved, the study medicine must be tested in research studies to see if it is safe and effective for treating the target disease in certain groups of people.

If you prequalify and give your permission, your information will be forwarded to a member of the clinical research team. They will contact you to discuss more information about participation.